Posted in Flash Fiction, Original Fiction

A Faux Pas

Cyndi shoved her way through the school halls, her vans squeaking loudly on the tile floor, as she searched desperately for Tyler her head whipping back and forth so quickly it was a miracle she didn’t get whiplash.

“Hey, Cyndi!” Alexis called, waving at her wildly. “Only one more week till we are free of this hell hole for good!” Cyndi’s gaze flickered over to her briefly and she shouted a greeting, voicing her hearty consent, before her attention returned to the problem at hand. “He’s over there.” Alexis informed her pointing in the direction of the gym doors, Cyndi’s eyes zeroed in on a familiar blonde head. “Thanks Alexis. Love you!”

“Tyler!” she screeched, pushing people out of the way with well placed elbows. The head turned slightly at the sound of his name, but continued on disappearing into the gym. With a burst of energy, Cyndi pulled herself free of the horde of teenagers urgently trying to escape from school.

She slammed into the gym doors like a hurricane, stumbling through and tripping over her own feet in her haste.

“Tyler!” Finally the blonde head stopped and turned around, blue eyes meeting hers. She pumped her arms back and forth. “Good-bye! See you, tomorrow, love you.”

A grin cracked across his face, “See you tomorrow, Cyndi.” He turned to go, only to pause and glance back, “Hey are we still on for this Saturday, Diana can’t wait to meet you.”

“Of course. I am so excited to meet your girlfriend. I can’t believe you kept her hidden from us for so long.” He laughed loudly before giving her a small wave, and hurrying over to his team. Cyndi grinned feeling a sense of accomplishment glad she hadn’t missed saying good-bye to Tyler.

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Posted in Literary Analysis

A Knight of…the people?

In Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The General Prologue”, the narrator tells us of the many pilgrims who plan to journey to Canterbury. Many characters are vividly described and clues about their character and persona are revealed. Throughout the various tales, many characters reappeared to add their opinions, agreeing or disagreeing heartily with whatever is being said, further developing their character. The Knight is the first pilgrim to be described, and he is afforded this honor due to his noble birth, being the only character of aristocracy in this group. The narrator seems to have a deep admiration for the knight,

a valiant man,

who, from the time when he had first begun

to ventured out, had loved chivalry,

truth and honor, liberality and courtesy.

(ll. 43-46)

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